Sunday, July 21, 2024

Brussels, my love? What EU elections mean for climate change

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In this edition, we learn why scientists reckon current southern European heatwaves are a direct consequence of climate change, and how recent elections might affect EU environmental targets.

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This week, with all eyes on an EU summit that filled Brussels’ top job vacancies, Méabh Mc Mahon spoke to Belgian climate activist Adelaide Charlier, corporate lobbyist Connor Allen and EU policy specialist Julian Parodi from EPICO.

Panelists considered what message European voters sent when they went to polls last May, and what impact that could have on EU climate legislation.

Complaints that EU environmental law is becoming an expensive imposition may have had an impact, with fewer voters opting for green parties.

Connor Allen said the EU’s flagship climate initiative is now a “zombie”, neither alive nor dead. “The Green Deal is going to survive, but in what form is it going to survive?”, he asked.

Julian Parodi examined the links between the climate transition and other policy worries such as security and the economy. “The most crucial aspect is now to what extent the climate aspects are associated to competitiveness”, he said.

Adelaide Charlier called to defend the Green Deal — which she says is the first time the EU has shown long-term vision.

“We’re not leaders in any other subjects. We have to make sure we keep the Green Deal to stay visionary”, she added.

Watch “Brussels, my love? in the player above.

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